Aug 6, 2018

FT-991A with GPS

I'm not sure why, but the Yaesu FT-991A does not come with a built-in GPS unit. So if you want that data included in digital QSO's, you will need to connect your own external GPS antenna. Now comes the Garmin GPS18x PC, a fully compatible NMEA GPS, WAAS enabled antenna that connects to the FT-991A's GPS/CAT DB9 serial port. Power is supplied by a 12 volt plug into my Yaesu FP-1030A power supply.
Setup is pretty simple with radio menu 028 set to GPS1, the default setting. Plug it in. Turn it on. Wait, slow down. Did you get that?

Now when you key up on a C4FM repeater - as well as with a few other functions - your location/distance is also transmitted/received for the other stations. And if it makes your day, you get the cool little green GPS satellite icon showing up on the FT-991A touchscreen. Nice!



Blessings!

Jul 23, 2018

Here Spot!

As I said previously, my home, mobile, and HT radios are all Yaesu with but one exception, that being a recent purchase of a Tytera MD-390 HT for DMR.

For several years now, I have been gaining interest in VoIP and digital comms in general. A Yaesu HRI-200 WIRES-X node might be pretty cool, but to my understanding, I would have to dedicate a Windows computer and a Yaesu C4FM radio like my FTM-400XDR. That is a bit more investment than I am willing to commit to given I don't even know if I will like it, so I began searching out other VoIP solutions.

After a bit of research, I decided to purchase the ZUMspot RPi kit which includes the ZUMspot-RPi UHF board rev. 0.4, Raspberry Pi Zero Wireless, and a micro SD card programmed with the Pi-Star software image. I also bought a layered case to keep it all safe.


After getting it assembled into the case, and setting up the WiFi and software, my first impression  was, "This thing is awesome!" Talk about easy to set up, this was so quick and simple. And how does it work? Fantastic!

One of the first "rooms" I connected to was the FCS00290, America Link WIRES-X. Immediately I hear clear, crisp, full-quieting digital voice from fellow HAMs in Australia, Japan, England, and Wales. Very cool! The one problem I had, though, was feeling as though I was cheating or something. Having a QSO on the internet just isn't the same as a QSO using only my own equipment, but man, it sure is interesting. Effortless QSOs with people all over the world. Who'd a thought!

And the ZUMspot is smaller than a 1 inch cut-off from a piece of 2x4 stud! Totally awesome!

More later...

Mar 7, 2018

Ready...

At times the road of life can get a little bumpy. Sometimes it looks like it won't last long. Other times it seems like all that lies ahead are bumps, more bumps, potholes, and well, you get it. How we respond to life - like it or not - will show the depth of our character. 

Seems to me we have three choices. Man-up and move ahead; dig-in and hold for the best opportunity to move ahead; make a calculated, tactical retreat to re-group, reassess, and implement a new strategy to move forward. 

This past weekend I decided to dig-in. A short stop to relieve the pressures of life and take a mental break to reassess my situation and prepare to keep moving forward. As I get settled into my desk chair with a nice cup of coffee, my calendar pops up with "ARRL DX Contest". Perfect.

Not-so-long story shorter, I added a - slow and relaxed - eleven countries to my QSO log. And for the first time, I had a QSO with Hawaii. I also got my log all up to date with my contact info. All said and done, it was a pretty good recovery weekend. OK life, let's see what you got for me this week. I'm ready...

God is good, always. Blessings!

Feb 19, 2018

She's a 10, or 11

The other day, my girlfriend Alexa, you know, the sweet thing that works over there at Amazon, was teasing me by trying to show what she's got for me. Well, it's about all I can do keep myself in line. Just ask my wife. Right?

So there it was, the littlest thing I ever did see. At first I couldn't believe it, but sure enough, there it was. A dinky little 4" x 4" x 1" thing that she said was the real deal. Yes, it was the tiniest, I mean the tiniest 10 meter radio I have ever seen. Wait, what? Yes, a dinky little radio described as a 10-11 meter Ham/CB radio. And now she has my full attention.

The short-story version has me doing some focused web surfing, a lot or research, and in the end finding that several roads all lead to one place. The Albrecht AE-6110, the Anytone Smart, and a few other sticker names are all stuck on the same radio. Prices were as high as $170, and as low as eBay's cool $58, with free shipping. Yes, that's right, short-story. Oh yeah.

So what's the big deal? No big deal! In fact, it's the tiniest deal I have ever seen for what's purported to be a worth-every-dollar-and-then-some transceiver that operates on both the 10 meter Amateur band for those of us with a ticket, and with a tiny mod either way, runs square on the "11 meter" or Citizens Band for those without a ticket. Whaaat? Yup. For $58 bucks, I decided I just had to try this.

During my research, I found several links to making the tiny - go figure - mod. There are some good YouTube videos and at least one or two really good blogs on this. Then I got to thinking about it and surmised that with a little help from a Digi-Key KAS2102ET DIP switch, the radio might be able to do either/or with just a "little" hood-pop, click, click, and she's a 10 or 11.

My research on this little radio also led me down another path. Is there such a thing as an antenna that works on both 10 and 11 meters? In the US, it seems solid options are hard to come by. Since the radio has a number of European frequency settings to choose from, I did my data digging around Old Blighty.

Blimey! What's that, Guv? The prized Les Wallen Modulator antennae. Seems Les and now a few other chaps have been making the Modulator for decades, and you can spot one for only about 20 quid. Crikey! Ends up this config is the cat's pajamas for this sort of thing. Now just get one on the way, and Bob's your uncle! I'll keep you posted.

Jan 9, 2018

Better Man

As we start into 2018, I find myself looking back at 2017 wondering how I ever made it through the year. From being super busy at work all spring and summer, Lyme's disease putting my wife and I down for 2 1/2 months, and dealing with a very significant illness with one of my kids, it seems like just when life is harder than it's ever been, something else happens. I'm sure you all have your own story like this.

Two things personal struggle can precipitate are pause and reflection. This year, I'm going to try to put these two things to work in my life by starting a personal journal. I have never done this before, but I found some good resources to assist me in this. Ends up one of our Founding Fathers wrote personal journals and really put some thought into it. Finding this, I decided to follow his example. Not just jotting down my thoughts, but using the methods of reflection and examination Benjamin Franklin exampled in his 13 virtues journal. So far, it's not yet habitual for me, but it certainly has been helpful.

What would I like to take away from this? I am broken and emotionally damaged from events in my life, and especially from serving others as a good cop. Now that I am done with that season of my life, I need healing and rebuilding in my mind and emotions. For my wife, for my family, and by God's grace, I am going to start this new year working to become a better man.

Check out The Art of Manliness for more info on Benjamin Franklin's 13 Virtues journal.

Dec 28, 2017

Logging Software

Chasing HF contacts without a radio log is sort of like playing a game and not keeping score. It's all fun just playing, but it sure is nice to look back and see all the countries and QSO's you made!

Over the years, I have had the opportunity to check out several software-based radio logs and tools. Through time and use, many I have deleted or no longer use, but a few programs have risen to the top of my list and are being used simultaneously, for comparison. The three on the top of my list, alphabetically, are Ham Radio Deluxe, HamLog CloudLog, and Log4OM. Links to each website are in the Ham Web Links in the right sidebar.

Ham Radio Deluxe
Ham Radio Deluxe is, well, very deluxe. It has more features than I have equipment, and it seems to perform all of it's capabilities very well. HRD brings together functions such as ADIF format log upload and download on QRZ, LoTW, and eQSL, a huge list of DX spotters to pick from, QSO mapping, sat tracking, rotator control, digital HF, available HRDLOG.net online log, and a few other goodies. I've been using HRD for about 7 years now, and it keeps getting better.


HRD Log screen
HRD Radio screen
HRD Sat Tracking screen
As you can see, HRD has very detailed screens and really good functionality. My hesitation comes with redundancy of functions, the cumbersome feeling with multiple windows, and too many buttons that perform the same functions.

It's hard to do all things well, especially when there are businesses that shine with their more singular areas of expertise. Do I need to have all the functions of my radio available on the computer screen? Not me. I just want my radio to "go there" when I find "the spot" I have been chasing. My take-away is this. With the depth and quality found in HRD, I'm sure they will continue to grow and improve for a long time to come.

Log4OM
Recently I began using Log4OM, another well integrated log and control program that retains visual simplicity, yet has so much going on behinds the scenes. So far, I am very impressed.

Log4OM has all the same online functions of HRD, and then some, plus and it links with HRDLOG.net for online log publishing on the HRDLOG.net website, or on your own.


Log4OM Recent QSO (log) screen
The various functions of Log4OM are well integrated. From call sign lookup or clicking on a spot or cluster line, all available data fields auto-populate for the potential QSO log entry. The station's gridsquare location and signal path also plot on the program's QSO Information map. To view any or all of your QSO's, Log4OM links to Google Earth and exports a KML file to plot and save all your QSO's grid locations to Google Earth.


Log4OM QSO Information (map) screen
Log4OM Cluster screen
This program is sophisticated, easy to use, and very easy to look at. The main input area always remains in view, while five tabs under the input area show the various info indicated in the pictures above. Super easy, yet doesn't look or function like an old Windows program from a bygone era. There are numerous videos for the beginner, to advanced user, on setup and use of Log4OM on the Terry Genes YouTube channel.

While searching for a radio log app designed for use on a Chromebook or Android tablet, I came across a cloud-based log system designed for use on these, or any platform. Now before you get all started on Chromebooks, let me ask, when was the last time you used a Chromebook? How about a new one? And what OS do I use to publish this blog? And what OS do I use for everything but?Yup, my new Asus C213S Chromebook, and I love it!

Cloud-based systems don't do heavy-lift computing on the user end of things like the PC database systems we are used to. Instead, they function as a workstation and relay data to an off-site server to be stored and retrieved. This can work for the amateur radio operator on a Chromebook just as easily as with a PC. All you need is an internet connection, or the format to temporarily store data while off-line. It's no different than running a call sign search on QRZ.com right now. In fact, it's exactly the same thing.

HamLog CloudLog
Thanks to the people at HamLog CloudLog, we take yet another step into the new era of amateur radio and computing. While still very basic - in logging software standards - HamLog CloudLog is a very efficient system that can run on any OS right now. And with the Android app, field days can be engaged with just an HT and smartphone/tablet. Awesome! What in the world is coming next?


HamLog CloudLog Log screen
HamLog CloudLog Tools screen
HamLog CloudLog Prefs screen
On the Android side of things, below are screenshots of some of the HamLog CloudLog Android app.


HamLog CloudLog Android App log screen
HamLog CloudLog Android App QSO entry screen
HamLog CloudLog Android App tools screen 1
HamLog CloudLog Android App tools screen 2
So there are some brief comments about three - or, really four - ham logs among the somewhat crowded field. In my opinion, and as far as I have researched, these are my top picks for really good radio logging software and systems that will continue to gain in popularity and function. Take your pick. They are all very nice!

Blessings!

Dec 12, 2017

Into the Future

As we get settled in to our new QTH, I find myself contemplating where and how I should set up my BWD-90 folded dipole antenna. Factors like the thick woods and metal 12/12 roof on our home, and the 55' tower behind it, makes finding a clear 110 feet not so easy. But wait, there may be an easy answer to this problem, like maybe the GAP Titan DX vertical antenna. As it goes, this was enough to open the box and look at other possibilities. Maybe its time to look at digital amateur radio.

Long story short, a new GAP Titan DX is in the garage just waiting to talk to the world, and for the last couple days, I have been collecting data and programming the new Yaesu FT-991A and FTM-400XDR with all of the Wisconsin repeaters, now including digital and System Fusion repeaters. On the to-do list, need to get the Titan DX up and install the FTM-400XDR in the Jeep.




So far, I can say I am impressed with the YSF digital signal. I was listening to the Milwaukee W9RH YSF repeater last night and it was exceptionally clear and strong, and that repeater is just 20 watts. I can hardly wait to get on the air and try it out for myself. It would be nice to see more YSF repeaters out there with their dual analog/digital capability modes.

Dec 6, 2017

Dusting off the HF

Yesterday I went down in the basement and retrieved the box containing my HF rig and paraphernalia. I brought the box up to my desk and took a look inside. After a few minutes, I closed the box and pushed it under my desk.

This morning, I decided to stop putting it off and get my HF stuff set up again. About two hours later, I had it all done. And there I sat, with no HF antenna up yet, I realized I may have wasted my morning. Before giving up, I decided to connect the 2M/440 antenna and make sure that worked. It didn't take long until I realized something wasn't working right.



I refreshed my memory by cruising through parts of the user's manual. Yup... Okay... Check. Still not sure, I downloaded the programming data from the radio so I could take a look at it. Yup... Okay... Nope. Doesn't look right. I imported updated repeater data to the RT Systems software, and then uploaded it to the radio. So, to make a long story shorter, the HF stuff is back in the box.

Not like it was a totally wasted day though. I took this opportunity to dust off my FT-7900, re-program it with my new data set, and got it up and running. Awesome!

Mar 31, 2017

Reflecting & Digital Radiation

After much thought and consideration after my dad's passing, I have decided to continue with amateur radio, not only for my own interest, or the memories of time spent with my dad, but for the possibilities of building new bonds with our four adult children with this great hobby.

Other than the 2M/440 bands, I have done very little with HF for several years, and still have not taken the time to get my HF rig set up. The 55 foot tower is up with a Diamond X-300A dual band vertical antenna on top of a 10' mast, but have not yet strung up dad's trusty old Barker & Williamson folded dipole HF antenna. Soon, I hope.

A growing interest in the digital side of amateur radio has added a Yaesu FTM-100DR mobile and the FT-2DR portable to my wish list so I can experience the world of digital radiation.

Feb 9, 2017

Amateur Radio Station K9KMS


When my father was young, he was an electronics geek always experimenting with short wave radio setups and antenna configurations from his home at 46 Hillside, New Hartford, New York. With a simple folded dipole antenna strung between his window and an old Hickory tree, he enjoyed many QSO's from all around the world!

Dad's interest in electronics and amateur radio continued while he was a U.S. Navy sub-mariner and Electronics Technician (ET) aboard the USS Chopper from 1951 to 1955. Continuing into his adult life, dad logged almost 10,000 QSO's and has confirmed 286 countries, most of which were made with less than 80 watts from a vertical antenna.

After my parents divorce in 1972, we became distant in many ways. I was a police detective, married with four children in Wisconsin. Dad was an engineer living in Nashua, New Hampshire. As the years passed, we had less and less in common, and were visiting each other just every few years.

In 2007, I studied amateur radio as a means to rebuild my relationship with dad through a common interest. On January 17, 2009 I earned my Technician license as KC9OYS, and on March 14, 2009 I earned my General license and changed to my current call sign, K9KMS.

Amateur radio not only helped improve my relationship with my dad, it has also led to a few personal accomplishments in my own life. For this, and for my dad, William C. Severn K2JGL, now a silent key, I am very grateful.